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By Diku Mandavia, MD, FACEP
on June 13, 2022

Ninety-five percent of head injured patients that visit the Emergency Department (ED) are considered to be “mild.” Many hospitals employ a fast-track, or similar pathway, for these patients. Their injury is not life threatening, they do not require the resources of more acute patients, and therefore in theory they can be quickly evaluated and discharged.

By BrainScope
on May 23, 2022

Many head injured patients arrive in the Emergency Department (ED) expecting a head CT “to be sure” their injury is not severe. Not fully understanding that while a head CT can identify if a brain bleed has occurred, it cannot detect a concussion, patients will often press for a head CT, as they find satisfaction in knowing “something was done” during their visit. 

By Susan Hertzberg
on April 12, 2022

In the mid-1960s the Beatles were not just a cultural force, they were an economic one. At their peak, their record sales and ticket sales were earning $650 a second in today's money. One beneficiary of the Beatles' rise to stardom was their record company, Electric and Music Industries (EMI), which owned the Abbey Road Studios. 

By Susan Hertzberg
on April 06, 2022

We’ve all read accounts in the news or may even know someone who has suffered a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion—athletes, celebrities, the hometown service hero. During the month of March, which is also Brain Injury Awareness Month, I spent some time reflecting on why I have and will continue to advance awareness and education to help improve evaluation and referral pathways for those suffering from head injury. 

By BrainScope
on February 11, 2022

As the world enters year three of COVID-19, patients are returning to the Emergency Department (ED), with volumes approaching pre-pandemic levels. Among those returning are head-injured patients—an ED patient population that has increased 30% in recent years. Seventy percent of these patients are evaluated as treat and release, but many spend up to six hours in the ED because of typical assessment protocols.

By BrainScope
on February 11, 2022

When patients arrive at the emergency department (ED) with a suspected head injury, clinicians need to quickly assess for severity and determine next steps. Does the patient have a brain injury—brain bleed, concussion, or both? Understanding what happens to the brain following a head injury can help determine the next steps for assessment and treatment.

Head trauma, of varying degrees, affects millions of Americans each year and results in significant morbidity rates and substantial economic costs to society. According to the Brain Injury Alliance of Connecticut, someone in the United States sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) every twenty-one seconds. On average, this equates to approximately 2.5 million TBI-related emergency department visits per year. Mild TBI (mTBI) is the most common type of TBI, accounting for approximately 95% of patients evaluated in the emergency department (ED) for a head injury. MTBI generally is representative of patients who report mild, non-penetrating traumatic injury associated with a brief alteration in brain function. Although mTBI is often considered an incidental and non-threatening injury, severe short and long-term effects have long been established. Additionally, there is broad acceptance that multiple mTBIs can have serious, long-term consequences.

By BrainScope
on May 26, 2021

An injury to the head is never a simple matter. Depending on the traumatic brain injury (TBI) diagnosis, it can either be mild, moderate, or severe. Thankfully, the human body has some protection from trauma, such as the human skull, which provides adequate protection for the brain inside it. According to the CDC, 70% to 90% of TBIs evaluated in the Emergency Department (ED) are considered mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) or concussions. As such, chances of concussion recovery are greater with early intervention. However, to obtain an objective diagnosis of concussion, patients need immediate medical attention to assess the injury’s severity.